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On-Premises Can Be Just as Effective as On-Cloud

There are plenty of good reasons to push the enterprise infrastructure model onto the cloud. It is cheaper, more flexible, and is becoming increasingly more secure and reliable as both hardware and software architectures evolve.

But there are plenty of good reasons to maintain a certain amount of on-premises infrastructure as well, and as time goes by, the deployment and management of that infrastructure will become vastly less complicated and expensive than what you find in today’s bloated data center.

Even Amazon is starting to rethink the all-cloud strategy that has driven its system development over the years. The company undoubtedly still thinks it provides the optimum environment for the bulk of enterprise workloads, but with releases like the recent Amazon Linux AMI (Amazon Machine Image), it also recognizes that some infrastructure will remain in the enterprise, at least for the time being. The system, according to E-Commerce Times, allows users to deploy the Linux AMI on internal resources, essentially providing tighter integration between local infrastructure and Amazon data centers. In this way, even high-performance applications can maintain a stable and secure link across hybrid deployments which, according to Amazon, would be most useful when developing and testing new apps and workloads at home before deploying them in the cloud.

In addition, there is the ability to deploy data reduction in either or bot on-premises or the cloud with Linux. Simply employ Permabit VDO for Data Centers in both and you can reduce data costs, increase data density and minimize network bandwidth consumption.

Whether on-cloud or on-premises, however, the final call will be made by the enterprise, which will now have to take into consideration its workload and application requirements, cost factors, performance goals, and a host of other elements for each and every deployment.

 

Whether on-cloud or on-premises, however, the final call will be made by the enterprise, which will now have to take into consideration its workload and application requirements, cost factors, performance goals, and a host of other elements for each and every deployment.

Read the source article at itbusinessedge.com

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